2009-09-01

Left-handed dishers (ice cream scoops)

Photo of dishers held by left and right hands

From looking over this blog's (brief) history, I guess it must be nearly impossible for me to write a post without making a follow-up to it. So, well, here's another one.

After giving dishers some more thought, it occurred to me that some types would be unsuitable or at least inconvenient for left-handed people to use. Basically, the sweeper in the scoop can be actuated in one of two ways, either by squeezing the entire handle or by pressing a thumb lever. Squeeze-handle dishers are actually ambidextrous, but to my knowledge thumb-lever dishers are only made for right-handed use. For the dishers listed in my previous post, I've made a chart of which ones are left-hand friendly:

Size Adcraft (metal) Adcraft (plastic) Fox Run Hamilton Beach Johnson Rose Norpro OXO Vollrath (metal) Vollrath (plastic) Zeroll
6 No No No No Yes
8 No Yes No No Yes No Yes
10 No No No Yes No Yes
12 No No No Yes No Yes
16 No Yes No No Yes No Yes
20 No Yes No No Yes Yes Yes No Yes
24 No No No Yes No Yes
30 Yes No No No Yes Yes No Yes
40 Yes No Yes No No Yes Yes No Yes
50 Yes Yes Yes Yes
60 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
70 Yes Yes Yes Yes
100 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes


THE TAKEAWAY

If you're left-handed, give squeeze-handle dishers (ice cream scoops) your top consideration. To learn more about disher sizes, see my previous post.

16 comments:

  1. Something that is often not considered when it comes to dishers with left handed cooks is that it isn't really the handle that is the problem. It is the sweeper inside the scoop.
    When used properly, the sweeper should be clear of the "cutting" edge of the scoop. Then the handle sweeps the sweeper through what's been scooped.
    When a lefty uses a disher the sweeper is on the cutting edge and it gets pushed out of place, particularly with harder foods, like ice cream, or squash. Then the sweeper is useless to sweep and remove the food.
    What we really need is a disher where the sweeper is on the reverse side.

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    1. YES!!! Thanks for pointing this out.

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  2. That's a very good point. I thought about the sweeper's position and movement while food is being released from the disher (and figured it didn't matter, so didn't write about it), but not while food is scooped into it. In this right-handed world, I don't think any dishers are made fully left-handed. Perhaps a left-handed cook can squeeze the handle while scooping and relax it while releasing food, but that seems pretty inconvenient as well.

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  3. Ok, so where can I get a left-handed ice cream scoop where the little wire inside the scoop swings in the right direction for left-handers??

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  4. I'm not aware of any scoops made that way. As I mentioned in the previous reply, left-handers will have to adapt by reversing the squeeze/open actions.

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  5. you try scooping it squeezed and then released its easier said than done. isnt there any way of reverseing the scraper arm so that it can be used by leftys easier? companys should be more considerate of all their clients not just the majority.

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  6. Nice info here. Keep us these great posts!

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  7. I also agree! I work with someone who is a Lefty, and the scooper companies need to make a scoop that is exactly like the right handed scoop, except opposite in the position of the thumb and the sweeper! While it is kind of funny to watch them try and scoop with a right handed scoop, it is also less productive and I know very very frustrating for them! These companies just need to get over themselves and Make thing exactly as they do for Righties, just opposite... for Lefties!

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  8. I have a small scooper I use for cookies. And I spend more time popping the dough out with my finger. It's messy and not that easy. I like the idea of the scoop but geesh can't they consider us lefty's. I hadn't considered a squeeze handle I'll have to see if I can find a small one for cookies. the scoop keeps the cookies all about the same size. My husband has to have his cookies. They're more of us leftys than the manufacture's want to admit.

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  9. One would think that there would be some left-handed scoops out there somewhere, after all, they make left-handed scissors.

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  10. It looks like this one would work for lefty's. I have always wanted a cookie scoop, but never could find one that was truly ambidextrous.
    http://www.kitchenkrafts.com/product.asp?pn=BE3298&utm_medium=shoppingengine&utm_source=googlebase&sid=GoogleProdAd&tid=CSE&cvsfa=2792&cvsfe=2&cvsfhu=424533323938&gclid=CO6eg9-Tl7ECFeUBQAodfDOKeA

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  11. This might work, but it is a spoon and not a scoop and does not come in different sizes. When you work in a kitchen you need different sizes for different chores.

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  12. My ice cream scoop has a thumb release in the middle. Instead of sliding the ice cream, dough or batter with the wire band, it just pushes or dumps the material out into the bowl. Complete ambidexterous! Unfortunately, this very useful tool is very, very hard to find and I have not seen it at all in the various sizes other than "large ice cream scoop"!

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  13. Anonymous 12/24/12 w/the ambidexterous ice cream scoop...where did you get it? I need something for cupcake batter. I am getting better at using my right hand, but as everyone else said, it's not the lever as much as the sweeper.

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  14. How hard can it be to make some scoops with the thumb release on the opposite side for left handed cooks I'm sure they would sell just as many scoops. Right now I use a right handed one but the lever is always in the potatoes.I've tried the one with the lever in the middle but it just isn't the same.

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    Replies
    1. Well, there are 1/10 as many lefties as there are righties, so they would probably only sell 1/10 as many scoops. Still, on a planet with over 7 billions people, that's still a lot of lefties. You'd think it would be worth it. And I daresay many of us would pay a premium to get a product that works for us.

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