2009-04-06

Texas caviar, for the patience-challenged

This is a simplification of my earlier Texas caviar recipe to eliminate cooking by using canned products. I've also attempted to streamline the instructions and improve their readability by trimming away details that should be self-evident. So with brevity in mind, let's get on with it.

RECIPE

Makes 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

For the base
Qty Unit Item
1 14–16 oz can Black-eyed peas
1 14–16 oz can Black beans
1 14–16 oz can Yellow corn kernels (not cream style)
1 small Red bell pepper (about 2/3 cup diced)
3 stalks Celery (about 2/3 cup diced)
1 small Onion (about 1/2 cup diced)

For the dressing
2 medium Garlic cloves
1 medium Jalapeno chile, fresh
1/4 tsp Ground cumin
1/2 tsp Table salt
1 tsp Ground black pepper
1/4 cup Apple cider vinegar
1/2 cup Neutral-tasting vegetable oil

EQUIPMENT

  • Can opener
  • Colander
  • Large (6 qt) and small (2 qt) mixing bowls
  • Knife and cutting board
  • Garlic press (optional)
  • Gloves (recommended for handling jalapeno)
  • Measuring cup (1- or 2-cup size)
  • Measuring spoons
  • Whisk
  • Wooden spoon or spatula

INSTRUCTIONS

Steps 1–3 are for the base, and Steps 4–6 are for the dressing. You can treat these as two separate tasks and do them at different times if you'd like.
  1. Empty the cans of black-eyed peas, black beans, and corn into a colander and rinse well. After rinsing, let the colander drain for a few minutes.
  2. In the meantime, dice the bell pepper, celery, and onion into 1/4" squares and place into the large bowl.
  3. Add the drained ingredients from the colander into the large bowl.
  4. Mince the garlic and place it into the small bowl.
  5. Dice the jalapeno into 1/8" squares and place it into the small bowl.
  6. Add the remaining dressing ingredients (cumin, salt, pepper, vinegar, and oil) to the small bowl. Whisk until the vinegar and oil are blended.
  7. Pour the dressing over the base ingredients in the large bowl, then stir to mix well.

TECHNIQUE

You know what's better than me blathering on and on about technique? Having an expert show you. I've included a few links above, but you know what's even better than text links? Videos. Check'em out.

Finally, although I already have a link to mincing garlic, ya gotta watch this video. Too bad he doesn't allow embedding, but it's really impressive how he rocks the knife (literally, starting at about 1:50). A master mincer, right there.

2 comments:

  1. Cool--I have been doing it all wrong! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love watching pros do the simple stuff. That garlic rumbler is amazing! Thanks for sharing that link!

    ReplyDelete

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